Skip to main content

About your Search

20121121
20121129
STATION
CNBC 9
CSPAN2 8
CSPAN 7
KCSM (PBS) 4
CNNW 3
FBC 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KQED (PBS) 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
MSNBCW 1
LANGUAGE
English 36
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)
" and paul krugman, author wrote train to talk about problems facing the u.s. economy for about an hour 45 next on booktv. [applause] >> well, thank thank you very m. thanks to the passionate attitude and technology in shakespeare books for hosting the event this evening. i also am very excited. i think we are all very excited to see probably two people who i would say are unquestionably the most cited economists in the world today. [applause] in addition to being most cited, and as you all know, those are noble laureates, i would have to say from the vantage point of the institute of economic thinking that if i were to nominate two people as being the most courageous economists in the world and the most impactful, the subpoena to find a list. so we're very excited to be part of this conversation. [applause] as you know, each of them has written a book that pertains to our current challenges and circumstance. joe stiglitz spoke, "the price of inequality" and paul krugman's book, "end this depression now!" are part of your goodie bag tonight. therefore on behalf of them i will thank you for
investing, and ultimately that's what gets the economy going at a rate that we haven't yet enjoyed so far in this recovery. >> then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- we're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking it up on the spending side. we've agreed -- we haven't agreed but there seems to be a movement toward the idea that some taxes will go up on the high end and the middle class won't see much of a tax increase. are we justified? >> i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and the other guests there. the typical consumer makes about $60,000 a year for their family. they're not getting tax dividends so they're not freaked up about those going up. they're concerned about their paychecks and paychecks have been more steady for the first time in several years, wages have gone up a little bit, and the biggest asset people own is a house. it's not just a volume of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with every passing week, a certain number of peo
've spent a good deal of your career working on, mr. hall, has been the improvement of the american economy. and tonight i'd like to join a couple of my colleagues on the democratic side to talk about the economy and specifically to talk about jobs and the things that we can do here in the a winning days of this congress -- wanning days of this congress to create some job opportunities. we've got some very heavy lifting here in congress in the next month and a half. everybody wants to talk about the fiscal cliff, some talk about austerity, bomb, others talk about what needs to be done to lift the debt limit. and all of these issues are before us. tax increases are not. but underlying all of that, foundational to all of that, is putting america back to work. getting americans back into their jobs. if we do that we will clearly increase employment and when you increase employment you always increase tax revenue to the federal government, to state governments and local governments. so our principle task as i see it and i think i'm joined by many of my colleagues, both democratic and republican
and extend the maturity of existing loans. mark carney prepares to take up the reigns of the uk economy any. unlikely to be any good news. third quarter gd figures expected to be revised down. and it's point, click, buy. americans were doing plenty of that yesterdays as early reports suggest online holiday sales soared on cyber monday. and all bets are off. prediction market entrade says it can no longer accept u.s. customers as market regulators say its trades aren't legal. shanghai composite closed below 2,000 for the first time in three years. it comes at a time when plenty have been talking up chinese growth prospects for next year. so we'll get into that more later. but 1991 is the closing level. this the main one to watch across asia. the nikkei did manage to continue it rally adding about 0.4% as the yen weakens on comments this morning. forex, the dollar-yen one to watch, 82.19 is the level there. the aussie dollar doing a little bit abouter despite that weak number on the shanghai composite. sterling is flat. we'll get into that more later. and euro-dollar just barely higher today,
's what gets the economy going at a rate that we haven't yet enjoyed so far in this recovery. >> so why? why then, dan, are we feeling this way? you share the view that we are not -- you're not done with the fiscal cliff. we're not going to suddenly solve our fiscal problems. we certainly haven't been talking enough on the spending side. there seems to be movement toward the idea that some people's taxes will go up at the high end. middle class won't see much of a tax increase. why the optimism? are we justified? >> well, i think the typical consumer is not like you and me and our other guests here. the typical median income is $60,000 a year for a family. they're not getting a lot of money from capital gains and dividends. they're not freaked out at the prospect of those going up. they're concerned about what is in their paycheck. paychecks are morsteady than they had been any time the last few years. wages are going up a little bit. the biggest asset that anybody owns is a house. we finally seem -- it's not just the value of sales rising and construction but home values. and so with e
, it is not a recession, it has been building for decade-sapping the ability of the american economy to grow, and the average american to rise. to make the u.s. less competitive, less attractive for business, we go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again because unless we get the economy really moving and growing in a long run, these budget problems will occur over and over again. we have identified eight areas where we find, these things would move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two or three or four years we start to see impact and there's quite bipartisan support. and the sustainable budget compromise. number 2, easing immigration now. we need a broader immigration reform, but it is one of the abilities to move rapidly to inject skill to the economy to fill jobs we badly need to fill to sustain our growth. it is not long term solution to the skill problem in america but a critical step we need to take to move the needle. we have got to simplify and realize the corporate tax code. everybody agrees. we just did a survey that included a loss of members of the general p
's really thinking that we're going to get this full 3.5%, 4% gdp hit smack into the economy on january 1st. the problem is that time is marching on. we've had the election, we've had thanksgiving. the excuses are running out. the lame-duck session is only so long. that's probably why the markets are getting nervous. although you may get a deal done in q-1 rather than in q-4, the fact that it actually hits from january 1st is going to keep business very cautious, very defensive and that's going to worry the equity market. >> it's interesting because it also comes against the landscape where we've seen chinese equities underperform, they reminded us very few of its member countries have great growth prospects going forward. that's probably wise. people are saying why is it that across the globe the u.s. fiscal cliff is such an issue. well, it's because sources of growth at this point are few and far between. >> that is the problem. where is growth going to come from. the one place that looked set for a reasonable 2013 was the u.s. economy. europe flat, china slower probably than this year. b
about the german economy. suggests we may be heading into possibly contraction territory. expecting it to be around 99.5 versus 100. expectations entex is frft at 93.2, unchanged from the previous reading. not out yet. kathleen brooks is with us. i'm not sure why we don't have it but anyway, whatever your expectations are for this, how close is germ 234i going to skirt with contraction in the fourth quarter? >> it certainly has been slowing down and it looks like there's the possibility that even germany is starting to have some mild contraction and maybe even in the technical recession i would think over the next two quarters. the economic indicators have been coming down in determine any, there had been an expectation that consumption kicks up more in the country. which it has a little bit, but a little less than maybe people have been expecting. obviously the fallout from the international crisis and the backdrop is not really helping. >>. >> euro-dollar edging up to a three week high. growth numbers don't seem to mary ann awful lot to the traders. >> no. it's been able to shrug
this drags on, the uncertainty continues to hurt the economy and continues to undermine markets. >> james nixon, thank you. autonomy's ceo says he's shocked by allegations of mismanagement. they've been forced to take a nearly $9 billion charge because of what it called serious improprieties. lynch says the trouble arose after hp took over the company. >> we've been talking about a massive elephant in the room that wasn't spotted. the reason it wasn't spotted is very simple, it wasn't there. it was done, in their own words, meticulously and great detail. and then they actually ran the company, including doing all of the books for the last four quarters. >> hp shares down 12% yesterday, closing on a ten-year low right now. that is the euro's closing price. >>> still to come later, he's now apologized to the investors for the poor call and says the end for hp is not even sight. >>> also, japan has posted its worst trade deficit in october for more than three decades. exports dropped sharply amid territorial tensions between tokyo and beijing. it indicates the world's third biggest economy i
by 20% stuff like that. the old problem was not enough spending in the economy. one player that should have been spending more was the government thinks to adolf felt hitler they did but they should have been doing to increase spending. there is overwhelming confirmation and this is a time to have the government spend more would pit -- but people to work and put capital to work it is hard politically because it is hard to persuade people which is why some of us write books. [laughter] >> host: someone argue with you to say you do the spending big issue of boost then you fall back. but we did not to. what happened? >> that is interesting story. a lot of people just like montgomery ward was a major store chain. but the major -- but he believed they would come back so he hoarded cash waiting for the depression to come back by the time it was clear they lost their position in the marketplace. is not steadied as much as it should have been but that story of what is going on is about excessive practice with the debt bubble and it burst leaving people stranded with too much debt. what happene
on the horizon. that's where we begin this morning. how confident are you about the state of the u.s. economy? what steps are you taking to prepare for the potential impact if the u.s. goes off the fiscal cliff? give us a call this morning. you can also catch up with us on all your favorite social media sites, twitter or facebook. or e-mail us. thismorning to you on wednesday, november 21. we are talking about federal reserve chairman ben bernanke's comments yesterday about the fiscal cliff, and getting your thoughts on bthe u.s. economy. and this headline -- also, in the financial times -- to tell little bit more about ben bernanke's , and sister day we turn to david clarke of "politico," their financial services editor. thanks for joining us. guest: thanks for having me. host: what is making the most waves from his speech? guest: in the past he has warned that congress and the president's path to take care of the fiscal cliff. yesterday he said it is not simply doing it but how they do it, making a point that voters will be looking to see if they can do this in a cooperative manner, whether
about how enacting comprehensive immigration reform can help on the jobs and economy issue. simply put, immigration reform would create a fair, humane and effective system that levels the playing field for all workers. right now our immigration system doesn't work for anyone but unscrupulous employers. we need to take the power out of the hands of those who are exploiting our current immigration situation and put it back in the hands of workers and fair and honest employers. if all workers have a legal status, employers can't skirt labor laws said they have to pay fair wages and abide the rules. immigration reform is the right thing to do as well as the economically smart thing to do. children should not have to live in fear of their parents deportation every day of their lives and some of the hardest working and most honorable people in our society should not have to be subject to exploitation and harassment. finally, i would just like to say that i'm truly appreciative of the support we have received from the urban league and other african-american leaders on this issue. i know that
's economy has continued to grow while the rest of europe has slowed. >> that growth is now so minimal that economists say 2013 next year could see a return to recession. still, german businesses shrugging off that possibility. >> business managers are upbeat about their future. >> german business leaders are optimistic that exports will remain strong, and the latest figures back that up. consumer confidence is also surprisingly robust. all the talk of a crisis in the eurozone does not seem to have dented people's desire to shock, but growth overall is beginning to falter -- the talk of a crisis does not seem to have dented people's desire to shop. the eurozone as a whole has fare worse with zero growth at the start of the year and then downhill from there. that has a knock on effect for german companies. so far, though, the german economy is weathering the storm. >> that news sent stocks in germany higher in what has been a bit of a winning streak recently. our correspondent has more from frankfurt. >> traders did not spend much time looking back on the slowdown of the german economy,
to go into the real economy. >> as we saw in our report, greeks are out protesting against this deal. what with the public like to see instead? >> i think the biggest thing they would like is some sense that the unemployment issue is going to be addressed. the protests we saw today were mainly involving municipal workers, city hall workers. not just in athens, as about 2/3 of city halls around the country were shut. many of those workers will be laid off between now and the end of the year. the government is finding it very hard to get the mayors of those city halls to send in the list of names of people who have to be laid off. >> thanks so much for the update. germany is a top lender to greece, and lawmakers are expected to approve the release of berlin's contribution immediately. still, there are deep suspicions that talks of a debt write-down have been delayed until after next year's german elections. >> the deal would be put to vote on thursday or friday. >> it is not an easy sell for the defense of the idea of letting greece buy back its bonds at below market value. >> it is im
spain to take the bailout, but of course many things can go wrong including the economy could be even worse than what we just discussed. in that case i think spain would ultimately have to apply. but i don't think they'll do that over the coming weeks. >> all right, ricardo, good to talk to you. thanks for that. don't forget, of course, if you have any thoughts, questions, comments, e-mail us at cnbc.com. it's thanksgiving to u.s. markets, so they're closed, so that means we have a special three hour show for european and asian viewers today. still to come, india's parliament has opened its winter's session for what could be a tough first day back to business for the prime minister. we'll find out what opposition he faces from our correspondent in mumbai. we'll also find out why asian casinos are putting their chips on the table despite slow economic growth in the region. and obama saves cobbler, but many of his turkey friends will end up on the table today. we evaluate the cost of a thanksgiving dinner with a soft commodities expert. all of that and lent more coming up over the cours
continue to believe that the u.s. economy is in pretty good shape. the consumer's in good shape. housing bottomed about 14, 15 months ago. companies like home depot, which recently exceeded expectations, raised long-term profitability goals, and portly, frank blake, who's orchestrated a great turnaround has noted that housing has finally gone from being a head wind to a tail wind. we like the asset management companies like waddell and reed. their flagship fund is in the eighth percentile year to date. industries and companies like retail, small banks, and home builders, we think are going to be good places to be as we go into the new year. >> all right. we will leave it there. rick santelli, final word from you on what drives fixed income and treasuries toward year end. same issues, i guess. >> well, i think next week, first of all, we have a gdp revision. second time around on third quarter. many are calling for a big upward revision from 2% to 2.8. if that actually happens, i think that would be a rather compelling reason outside of quiet holiday markets to see some sustained selling
. this is someone else on the investment committee said. is point was the transformation of the world economy lift poor people in china and india into the middle class and one american drops out of the middle class, that is not such a bad trade, 4-1. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company and this is a person with a charming and lovely life story, his parents were immigrants and he told me his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily for. imagine that, temporarily poor and sure enough complete rock stars, both of them went to new york. and the mass club, one brother in silicon valley and another is derivative on wall street. the technology cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program in applied math at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming plutocrats. very hard-working guy, did smart, did great, this is what he said about the american middle-class. we are demand higher paycheck than the rest of the world. if you are going to demand ten times the paycheck you need to deliver ten times the value. it sou
assurances that the nation's economy is sound after u.s. credit rating agency moody's stripped them of their prize the a.a.a. status. this follows the cut by standard and poor's and it was expected. >> hollande is trying to revive the eurozone the second-largest economy. moody's had nothing good to say about france's economic prospects. they say the country has become less competitive and its labor market has turned staid. they say this makes them more bolt -- vulnerable to turbulence elsewhere in the eurozone. the french finance minister moscovici rejected the you downgrade. >> this does not put into question the fundamentals of our economy or reforms utaken hat by the government. it does not? creditworthiness. >> he blames the previous french government for failing to balance the budget. nonetheless, he says the downgrade is exaggerated. private u.s. rating agencies like moody's are subject to much flak in europe. critics say they gave ailing wrote u.s. banks operating as in 2008. many want the establishment of an independent rating agency instead. >> the european markets take the
and then they looked at taxes, the economy, jobs, and they went to the president. >> what is an emerging trend in technology or how people consumer information that will have implications for 2014? the leading edge? >> that is a good question. the prevalence of people getting their information online has exploded. you look as swing voters and how little they are watching tv, we all had three places you got your news from. now they get their nightly news from 15 sources. jon stewart is an important moment from that. if you are a democratic-leaning woman, you love rachel maddow. getting to those people is harder. they are way more online than anyone. you have to go to where they are. campaigns will spend more and more of their money online than ever before. until it reaches parity with television. >> and you think television will still be big in 2016. >> it is going to be the dominant media but online is going to catch up very quickly. i think it already is catching up for young voters who are looking -- >> within a couple cycles? >> no question. i think the next election is going to have to dec
breaking this pledge? >> let's distinguish with what boehner have said. i certainly agree, if the economy grew at 4% instead of 2% for the next decade, the federal government would net an additional $5 trillion. you could pay all of obama's death down. connell: that is not what he is talking about. >> okay. i am sorry. what he said is what i said. what obama claims he said is a separate matter. boehner was very clear. obama said, oh, you have agreed to tax increases. the talks collapsed because obama misstated. connell: what you say to republicans who are thinking about breaking the pledge? >> look, most republicans have signed the pledge. even the ones who have not have made it very clear even when they ran for office, higher taxes have hurt the economy. they have spent too much money. the entitlements are looking to break the economy. we need to spend less. raising taxes to get the politicians more money to continue spending, does not solve any problems. connell: i know you think this is the narratives being pushed by the media and all of that, if they do break it, that does speak to yo
. it is is sapping the ability of the american economy to grow and it is topping -- zapping the ability of the average american to rise. until we look at the major core issues that are making the u.s. more attractive to business, we will go back to the fiscal cliff discussion over and over again. unless we can get our economy really moving and growing in the long run, these will just occur over and over again. we identified eight areas, as you mentioned, where we find there is broad consensus where we believe these things would really move the needle in a reasonable time frame, two, three, four years. there is some real bipartisan support. the first is the need of a sustainable budget compromise. that is widely accepted by all. two, easing on highly skilled immigration now. yes, when a broader immigration reform, but this is one of the abilities to really move rapidly to inject skills and to the economy and fill jobs badly need to be filled to sustain our growth. it is not a long-term solution and there, but it is a critical step we can take now that would really move the needle. we hav
.s. economy. a television series based on the united states is currently in development as well. we're pleased to welcome to hear about his newest book, a pitcher's history of the modern world, which in this case is going to be from 1898, two just after the second world war. please join me in welcoming larry schweikart. [applause] >> well, thanks so much to heritage foundation for inviting me here. it's really an honor and one that i wish my father was alive to see. heritage is one of those great bastian said liberty in a swelling sea of collect this and. you probably didn't know that you are getting somebody here who was the previous rock drummer. this later became significant learning -- as a learning experience when i began working on this film. but all along, my experience and about and were pretty informative. sma students i know about communism because i was in a rock band. we shared everything, had nothing to start. when mike allen and i would've "a patriot's history of the modern world," we identified three major elements that made up americanism. nevertheless, we never really provided
of the arguments when it comes to the you relate to the economy. -- most of the arguments when it comes to the e you relate to the economy -- most of the arguments when it comes to the eu. >> i think we're just failing to allow a lot of the time, and then our own country is suffering. we're too busy dealing with everyone else. am i think the -- >> i think the eu has a lot to do to get itself out of trouble. >> those in favor of the eu are in the minority here, but they are part of. one growth organizes cultural exchanges -- one group organizes cultural exchanges. they are going to supply the local christmas market with wine from their local german city. >> i feel part of europe, rather than british particularly, but then may be i am the odd one. who is to say. >> although he is a fervent european, he thinks he is likely to remain the odd one out for some time to come. >> the government situation, and employment, the general economic situation, and generally, you look for scapegoats, and europe is a good scapegoat. >> even today, many britons think the enemy is on the continent in brussels. them
economy -- due to concerns. >> there are talks in brussels, and it was on the minds of traders. we have this summary from the frankfurt stock exchange. >> the negotiations about the rescue package for greece our way and down on the share markets at the beginning of this week. traders are hoping that there will not be a long term -- that there will be a long-term solution but only the euro showed that investors seem to be rather optimistic. the hero has been quite strong today. optimism also for the german economy. the german consumer confidence has been stronger than expected. some investors hope now that german consumers buy more christmas presents than they have before. >> a quick look at some market numbers now. dax closing down 0.25%. euro stoxx down. the dow jones is currently down about 0.5%. the euro was trading for $1.2961. swiss bank ubs has been fined 37 million euro for regulation and failures lead into a rogue trader losing billions for the company. >> the employee was convicted of fraud dance that -- sentenced to seven years in prison. they describe the risk control systems
. but the transformation of the economy and meanwhile what america and drops out that is not a bad trade. i spoke to the cfo of but technology company as a person that was tied with these born and told me his parents told him that they were temporarily pour. imagine that. sure enough him and his brothers are both rock stars and avid members of the club now they find it. one does silicon valley the other does derivatives on wall street. his parents were angry because he dropped out of the ph.d. program of applied map after going to harvard. very smart and it did great and this is what he said. we demand a higher paycheck and the rest of the world. said you need to deliver 10 times the value. it sounds harsh but people in the middle class need to decide to take a pay cut. similarly was when i heard about the financial crisis. i expected wall street to feel guilty and realize you don't tell the truth to the reporter but they are off the record. almost invariably they did not blame themselves. this ceo told me sincerely he did not feel guilty for the crisis the culprit was his cousin who owns three c
economy by shopping at locally owned stores. the movement is in its third year. and it is growing. according to a new survey 67% of shopper who's know about small business saturday plan to take part in it. that's up 44% from last year. dave, i know this has made you very sad. hollywood is mourning the loss of larry hagman. >> j.r. >> wait a minute. it's your style j.r., my wife and the man who put cliff barnes in office. >> you have got plenty of trouble before y'all got married. i don't understand why you think she has changed. >> hey. stop. knock it off. >> classic. >> legend. >> hagman best known for his role of course as the villain j.r. ewing on his star with dallas. lost his battle with cancer dallas hospital. linda gray had this to say on the star's passing. larry hagman was my best friend for 35 years. he brought joy to everyone he knew. i will miss him enor muresly. >> she was at his side. >> he he was apparently surrounded by family and friends. >> hagman was the son of mary martin. he was also known for his role as major tony nelson in i dream of jeanne, of course, he w
that central bankers can't rescue the u.s. economy if it goes over the fiscal cliff. paul is president of financial capital. given that we're talking about this so much with these guys not around, all we do is we keep showing how much time we have as it's ticking down. when they do get back, paul, how do you think that the deal looks if they do put one together, and do they get it done? >> good morning, and happy thanksgiving to y'all. we all know it's getting done, whether it gets done before christmas or in january, a deal's going to get done. i think also everyone knows taxes are unfortunately -- taxes are going to go up. i don't know it's going to be at the 250 level. maybe at the 500 or million-dollar level. but taxes are going to go up and expenses are going to get cut. so we all wish they would stop the jawboning and positioning and politicking, sit in a room with dulls, both give in a little bit and move on. but they're going to push and push and push and the markets will push a deal to get it done. >> so if you were trying to decide what to do, would you just stand pat with eq
are not spread across the board. the economy would take a hit of $500 billion, probably sending the country back boo recession. i get what the white house is saying and what people like patty murray are saying about how we should negotiate this and whether it's a cliff or a slope. >> it's a financial cliff claven. >> slope. >> i think even if it is a slope, if we go over the fiscal slope, it will do a lot of damage. >> right it could -- the markets will react, freak out. >> that's where the damage will be done. >> i love politico, a growing block of emboldened emboldened liberals. [ screaming ] >> say they're not afraid to watch defense spending get gouged. [ scream ] >> stephanie: if republicans captain see their way toward additional revenues then we're better off going over the cliff and readdressing this with a better congress in january. >> it's the republicans holding the country hostage. >> they're saying it's more of a slope where the economic effects will be handled gradually. we're going to have a whole new congress. >> more democrats. >> we have the technology. we can make them better
around. >> okay. >> what else do we have in news? >> we have the economy. we'll begin there now at 4 past the hour. >> we're going to keep reading the post. go ahead. >> the markets look to rebound after stocks finished relatively flat yesterday following a new warning from the central bank about the fiscal cliff. speaking to the economic club of new york, fed chair ben bernanke urged lawmakers to reach a deal to avoid the automatic spending cuts and tax increases. he said going over the fiscal cliff would pose a substantial risk to the economy. according to a new study the fiscal cliff could give 90% of americans new tax bills when the bush tax rates and some by president obama would both end. the working poor would be among the hardest hit. a tax policy center analysis showed a married couple making about $30,000 a year would on average go from receiving a $15 tax credit to owing $1400. >> wow. >> yeah. that's probably a reason to try and get something done? >> maybe we will. maybe we will. >> you would think. >> yeah. or maybe we can just talk about 2016. >> we could do that as well. h
, they spent a lot of time thinking about the future. so in the next four years who can i trust on the economy, on social issues and foreign policy. and we live in a country that is even pli divided politically and we have close elections. our victory in 2008 was a landslide. it was clear this election was going to be closer, fwiven the economy and divisions in the country. with that being said, we still won electoral college, maybe not a landslide but a clear majority. our popular vote is 3% which is a healthy margin. and i think the reason we won is people understood where we had been economically. all of you have lived through the recession. this is not something that is an academic theory. everyone painfully lived through the recession. we are beginning to recover from that. the economy has created jobs over 5 fnt 5 million jobs which our economy is far too week but the electorate said i'm beginning to feel some progress. does that mean i'm satisfied? of course not. but i'm beginning to feel some progress and i think people thought it was a risk to go back and try economic policies that le
us a lot about the state of the consumer and the u.s. economy today. so we're turning to one of the most seasoned and respected voices on wall street for help. we have dana telsey. she is our guest host for the next three hours. andrew, i'll send it over to you. >> we begin with a visit to toyland and here is toys r us. it opened its doors at 8:00 last night. and we have toys r us ceo joining us right now from the company's flagship store in times square. good morning. >> good morning. >> so i read a report you you had a big line. what's it been like all evening? >> it's been great. we did have a big line. we're at 44th and broadway.line went all the the way to 45th street and then down 45th all the way to 6th avenue. it was huge. people came in in a real celebratory mood. people ate ice cream, relaxed with their kids. i've never seen a black friday like this before, but 8:00 hour worked really well for families. >> let's talk about sales. how did it go overnight? >> we're just starting. this is 5:00 a.m. on black friday morning. we're really just starting. we have about a b.
and work there, a growing number are educated professionals contributing to the economy. according to a survey, 1/3 of swiss people are against this influx. this person experienced this firsthand when he came to zurich six years ago. he still does not feel at home. and for good reason. >> you notice being socially excluded from groups, not being talked to, sometimes being disadvantaged it work. not openly, but behind closed doors. >> well-off members of the swiss-german club are taking a different route and getting to know each other amidst the mountains. the self-help groups think the founder of the club is out of line. >> they should get in touch and then they can see how to tackle this a little more amicably. >> some germans' bad experiences have broken down the harmony even here, especially in the case of bosses. >> you need order. you have to take people and colleagues with you, and then it works. there is no working order here. >> a short introduction. >> hello, everyone. [laughter] >> it is his turn to improvise. he slips into the role of a swiss man bad mouthing germans. >>
have difficulties in meeting the payments on other bonds. latin america's third biggest economy could be headed for another debt crisis. >> they certainly have the power to send the financial markets into a tailspin. we are, of course, talking about the ratings agencies. >> after years of dithering and delays, brussels has agreed to a set of controls designed to limit their influence, but critics call it a miniature reform that misses the mark. >> weather it is greece, spain, portugal, or italy, eurozone crisis countries have had credit ratings consistently downgraded by the major ratings agencies. a lower credit rating usually means countries have to pay higher interest on any loans they take out. they can also cause turbulence in financial markets. the european union has introduced new rules to limit their effect. other agencies will have to publish their ratings outside of stock exchange opening hours. i also have to disclose the criteria by which they make decisions, and the rules should make it easier for agencies to be sued if they have made errors when reading a country's credi
combined. a whole different league, partly because of technologies, partly because the economy is doing so well. the reality, that is a very strong deterrent to the egyptians or to the turks to get involved. >> >>. >> fareed, what does this mean about iran? the power and involvement of iran? >> i think it shows their limits, bogged down with their ally syria. trying to do something about that. i doubt they were involved very much with this in the first place. they don't have much of a reach. this has always been the claim, through hezbollah and hamas, they had some special asymmetrical power. israel really dominates the region. if the israelis want to make peace -- palestinians want peace, they will make it on israeli terms right now. >> anne marie, do you agree with that? >> well, part. one thing i would note, one of the reasons that israel has such military predominance is also because of the tremendous support the obama administration has given israel on defense matters. have you heard ambassador oren refer to u.s. assistance on iron dome, and the obama administration has pointed out mu
e-book, "the amazon economy," is out next week. thanks for being with us. >> good to be here. >> sreenivasan: so help us understand, why are these retailers doing this? why is it so important? >> this holiday season we're going to see consumers who are still pretty cautious and as a result of that retailers are just a little bit desperate. these early openings are all about trying to grab the attention of consumers as soon as they can and grab a few of those dollars because overall the holiday season it may be that the shopping pie doesn't grow that much. so these retailers want to grab their own slice as soon as they possibly can. >> sreenivasan: so wal-mart was onof the b stores to d so. they were already opening at midnight. why push it into thanksgiving day itself? >> the competition among the retailers and i think they're inspiring each other to move it earlier and earlier because as people are going to be queuing up perhaps they want to be outside the store that's going to open first. so this cream phenomena is has set in as retailers are trying to outdo each other. >>
for the demands of the -- training that they need for the modern economy? >> it is available. we can do better. we can structure some of those programs better so that individuals who stars school have the support mechanisms to finish an associate's degree or bachelor's degree if that is their goal. we can do better at that. there are well intentioned programs that are not quite efficient or effective as i hope there will be in the future. >> at the wharton school of business and the university of iowa -- it offers in-state tuition for returning veterans. what is the impact on the present -- campus? the president said we have 200 of them. they have lifted the entire campus. as someone who went through the university of iowa -- i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership. we do not have to go do that again. [laughter] that is value added when these young men and women come back and into an academic or training program of some kind. >> i could not agree more. at the city college of new york, we had a specific program at the powell center that i am happy to have named after me. we take in
economies in the world. the u.s. and china share a lot of interests and most importantly people in both countries share an interest in for example dealing with climate change. something that neither government is not the chinese are u.s. government are prepared to move strongly enough to change. when we talk about pivoting in the context of sending the troops, that doesn't help when we are trying to do with what should we be doing about climate change. i think what we really need is a pivot away from the military being the centerpiece of our diplomatic shift and a shift towards engagement with people at an entirely different level. >> host: a recent study by the brand company in the project for the air force talked about u.s. overseas military presence and the strategic choices that the government has to make. one of the comments in that report says, the u.s. has to decide whether china and the united states should rely primarily on u.s. space forces to respond to global crises and conflicts keeping only a small group of presence to reassure allies and partners. such a choice would be b
and others, are they getting the kind of training they need in this economy? >> i think it's available. i think we can do better with it. there are some facts like completion rates for gi bill education are not as high as they ought to be. i think we can structure some of those programs a little better so individuals who start school have the kind of support mechanisms to be built to finish either an associate's degree or bachelor's degree, if that is their goal. but we can do better at that. there are well-intentioned programs that are not quite as efficient or effective at this point. >> the wharton school of business and the university of iowa, the university of iowa offers in-state tuition to returning veterans. i ask the president what's the impact on the campus? he said beyond my ability to describe. i could have used that kind of mentoring and leadership at one. -- one point as a graduate of iowa. when these young and women come back and enter an academic or training program of some kind, we need this. >> i cannot agree more. city college of new york, mike alma mater, we had a spec
and they in turn support the local economy and communities. >> if you love bookstores, if you love what's left of hardware stores, any kind of small store, you have to spend your dollars there. otherwise, we will go away. >> reporter: sure, american express will give their cardholders $25 for shopping at small businesses on saturday. and some stores will offer discounts and giveaways. but they say the biggest incentives for shoppers are unique gives you wouldn't find elsewhere and a better shopping experience. >> we have i think unparalleled service. we know what we're talking about. we know how to fit people into clothes and make them look good and make them feel good about themselves. >> more of a joyous move mood than a frenzy. >> reporter: shoppers come here to avoid chaos that they see in big box stores and believe these smaller stores offer higher quality products. >> small businesses there's more original gifts so it's easier to buy unique things for folks. ♪ [ music ] >> reporter: and here's something you wouldn't find at the mall. a local band rocking out on a mini convertible. ♪
's a wonderful point. longer term you are looking at the united states economy doing better than not bad. it will grind along. we're not calling it for a double dip recession in 2013. we think fiscal cliff will be resolved in large part. creating opportunity if you have done your homework and you have long-term discipline, use vo volatility to your advantage. great cash position. europe has good companies. china will stimulate. not like in 2009 but it will be there. i think the death of equities and u.s. market is greatly exaggerated. you do have to do your homework because short-term volatility will give you opportunities and challenges. >> after what we hear this weekend, does it make sense to focus on discretionary going into year end? >> it does. it has coming into the third and fourth quarter. again, pick your battles. understand what you're getting into. name specific analysis is critical. build that portfolio. look globally. it's more than just a u.s. story. looking into europe, emerging markets if you have a longer term time horizon. commodities. all of these things are going to
Search Results 0 to 44 of about 45 (some duplicates have been removed)